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of u.s. security agents. benghazi, tripoli and washington coordinated effectively with each other on the night of the attacks. the interagency response was timely and appropriate. but there was not enough time for u.s. military forces to have made a difference. having said that, it is not reasonable nor feasible to tether u.s. forces at the ready to respond to protect every high risk post in the world. we have found that there was no immediate tactical warning of the september 11 attacks. if there was a knowledge gap in the intelligence community's en understanding of extremist militias in benghazi -- in this context, increased violence .ailed to com we did not find that any individual u.s. government employee engaged in willful misconduct or knowingly ignored his or her responsibilities. we did conclude that certain state department bureau level senior officials in critical positions of authority and responsibility in washington demonstrate a lack of leadership and management ability a program for senior ranks and their responses to security concerns posed by the special mission.
a hunting trip. but ron, he said, you go back to washington and you get your colleagues to do something about the assault weapons and the extended clips and that is what i'm here to do along with my colleagues and we look forward to reaching a cross the aisle and having a similar dwarfing of republican members of -- gathering of republican members of congress to take care of this problem once and for all. >> i want to thank you for your outstanding leadership on this matter. i'm a discharged veteran who earned an expert marksmanship medal while i was in the service. i'm also the parent of a son murdered on the south side of the city of chicago. and i am a pastor of my church. i am here to support hr 308. the large capacity ammunition device act which i have been a co-sponsor of since march of last year. hearing reports that there are 264,000 -- rifles manufactured each year in the u.s. and of those a 5,443 are exported overseas and 248,000 are used right here in the u.s. a bitter irony that we are confronted with at sandy hook is that the firearm industry's association their headquarter
's washington office. she's always been on the cutting edge of things that really matter. let me start off by saying i do not think there is an anti- innovation caucus. i do not think there is anybody who is opposed to innovation. it is a little bit like apple pie or rg3. let me ask you all to describe what we really mean by innovation. what are the two or three priorities we ought to really be talking about? glenn? >> let's start on that side. >> i thought you'd start on that side. >> i go to my right first. >> there are three types of innovation. one is scientific innovation that allows the second innovation which is the technology innovation, to take the underlying discovery and commercialize its, turning it into a product that can be used for consumer customers. what is equally important is how you can then take a discovery, it turned into a technology, and you can deliver it in a way that allows you to build a business that gets you a margin that can support the business. basic science innovation, technology innovations, and business model innovations are the ones we think of. google
, it is not only vote on the ground, this is an understanding in washington why many people are here. you talk about helping syria. it is basically getting enough help, either of the aid -- enough aid to help those that have been fighting for over a year. there are many commanders that have been proven to be a very trusted people. i really do not know how much this administration tried to find the good people, because when you talk to the officials there, how do you know who was good and bad? if you start trying to find your man now, you are probably too late already. this is my last point, i personally know a couple of people who have been living in the u.s. for 20-30 years and have been financing and fighting themselves. at least they could be easy to fund, but unfortunately they always complain they could not get allegiance from the administration. >> your answer is the u.s. government should provide more support to the insurgency? he could definitely. >> in the form of? >> heavy army. >> in terms of recommendations for the administration, they need to understand time is not on their side.
to be with us. it's nice to close the doors from the rest of washington and the fiscal cliff debate for a little while and talk about fiscal challenges elsewhere. whether it's a good news or bad news, at least it gives us an opportunity to talk about something a little bit different than the news of the day in this final two weeks, i think, before hopefully congress finds an opportunity to either avoid or move or solve some of the fiscal cliff issues and fiscal challenges that we face. and thank you for dick gravich and the work of the panel and the commission he co--led. there are copies of that report that were available when you came in. it's an excellent document that i really encourage everyone to take a close read. it's filled with good analytics in terms of what's going on on the state level. to help us understand. and i fully agree, dick, with your comments earlier about the disconnect. here in washington, obviously, we're facing our own serious challenges. and sometimes those challenges seem so overwhelming that the notion of adding in the layer of complexity to think about the conseque
. americans have a right to know the washington money -- the money washington tension there is well spent. our duty on the oversight and government reform committee is to protect these rights. our solemn responsibility is to hold the government accountable to the taxpayer. it is our job to work tirelessly in partnership with citizen watchdogs to deliver the fax to the american people and bring general reform to bureaucracy. our committee's resources are limited, in one area, we have focused for more than six years. and that is taking drugs and dangerous substances out of professional sports. we do some -- we do so for a bipartisan basis. we do so because what professional sports do is what collegiate sports do and it is what children aspire to do. we cannot take professional sports a in isolation, because ultimately it trickles down to the youngest. when we began our work on a bipartisan basis on steroids in baseball, steroids have become common at the high-school level. today i believe it is dramatically reduced but not eliminated. it in play last season. we are now finishing this season, and
are looking at that now. we're trying to figure out what the cost would be. money will be tight in washington trying to come up with something, but it looks cost-effective. >> thank you very much. let the record show that you always been so generous with giving me all the time of want. nobody else ever does that. >> if you would like to stay for another round of questions, we will be glad. >> thank you. >> let me just ask a couple of questions that occurred to me. it seems to me we have three different issues and maybe more than three. this idea of putting a five-year limit on these credits, i think the mindset that leads to that, at least with regard to some of these incentives, is that we are trying to support new technologies or emerging technologies or early stage technologies, and we want to support them but we won to be able to progress to a point where they can stand on their own after a certain time and compete in the marketplace. so that makes sense to have a tax credit or provision to encourage the use of that technology and in phase-in out. it seems to me much of the other things w
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7